Moyra Davey’s We Are Young is composed mostly of details from Mary Shelley’s published journal. Although Shelley found living with her stepsister Claire Clairmont very difficult, she was incredibly discreet and used a sun as an ironic symbol to indicate Claire’s presence that day. The text “Notes” is from Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. “S***” and “C***” are from Shelley’s History of a Six Weeks’ Tour and are code for Percy Bysshe Shelley and Claire. “Adieu” and “Mary” are, again, from Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written During a Short Residence. The scribbles are from Claire Clairmont’s diary. The photographs of the pool table and pinball machines, shot by Davey when she was around the same age as Mary and Claire when they embarked on their legendary “six weeks tour,” represent her personal connection to the two women. Photograph courtesy Murray Guy, New York

 
 
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Moyra Davey’s Six Weeks Tour takes its title from Mary Shelley and Percy Bysshe Shelley's History of a Six Weeks' Tour Through a Part of France, Switzerland, Germany, and Holland, which includes letters that describe a sail round the Lake of Geneva and the glaciers of Chamounix. Davey's photographs show books; relics, such as locks of hair, from the Keats-Shelley House in Rome; a gravestone in Rome's Protestant Cemetery; glimpses of domestic spaces; a copy of Palladio’s Four Books on Architecture, from NYPL's Celebrating 100 years exhibition; and details of two U.S. 25-cent coins, their stamped year of issue marking the birth years of two of Davey's sisters. Photograph courtesy Murray Guy, New York

 
 
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Moyra Davey’s Mary, Mari comprises close-up images from the first edition of Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark (1796), which set down the author’s impressions of her four-month journey across northern Europe, cast in the form of “letters” to her lover Gilbert Imlay. Davey's images are of “catchwords,” words inserted in the lower right-hand corners of pages that repeat the first word of the following page, helping bookbinders assemble a book in the correct order. Photo courtesy Murray Guy, New York

 
 
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Although Lorna Bieber does not directly intervene in the photochemical process, she nevertheless likens her process to alchemy. The metaphor is appropriate, because for three decades she has transformed the base materials of her art — found images and stock photographs — into mysterious and beautiful silver prints. This transmutation comes courtesy of a laborious process of photocopying, collaging, cropping, manually enhancing, and rephotographing. In the series Babies, Bieber developed a vocabulary of heads, bodies, and backgrounds to create images “meant to feel like fragments of a larger, unknown story.” At the time, she was using a photocopier that printed on paper that measured 18 x 24 1/2 inches; the final silver prints replicated the look of the photocopies and the soft quality of toner on paper. Lorna Bieber (American, b. 1949), “Dressing Room”; gelatin silver print from the series Babies, 1991. NYPL, Wallach Division, Photography Collection

 
 
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Thomas Holcroft, a close friend of Godwin’s in the 1790s who was arrested for treason, from whom Godwin later became estranged. The men reconciled on Holcroft’s deathbed in 1809. NYPL, Pforzheimer Collection

 
 

An illustration from Beauty and the Beast. The first English version appeared when William Godwin was one year old; he found it exciting. NYPL, Pforzheimer Collection

 
 
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A selection from Charles Lamb’s “Elia” essays, illustrated by Walter Crane in an early 20th-century volume. NYPL, Pforzheimer Collection

 
 

The fable of “The Grasshopper and the Ant.” NYPL, Pforzheimer Collection

 
 

The fable of “The Fox and the Raven.” NYPL, Pforzheimer Collection

 
 

The fable of “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse.” NYPL, Pforzheimer Collection