“Punishment of convicts — torture and death by the shower-bath at Sing Sing,” an illustration from Harper’s Weekly, April 17, 1869. NYPL, Picture Collection

 
 

“Jack brings the giant prisoner to King Alfred,” an illiustration in The Cruikshank Fairy-Book. NYPL, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs

 
 

Photograph of a cell in Sing Sing prison, Ossining, New York, from The Pageant of America: A Pictorial History of the United States, commemorating the nation’s sesquicentennial in 1926. NYPL, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs

 
 
 
 
 
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Jan van de Velde II (Dutch, 1593–1641), “Two Cowherds and Bulls near a Dilapidated House”; etching, 1616. NYPL, Wallach Division, Print Collection

 
 

Jan van de Velde learned the craft of printmaking from the engraver Jacob Matham in Haarlem and was registered there as a master in 1614. A prolific printmaker, he produced a number of views of Rome and a large Panorama of Naples, but surprisingly he seems not to have spent any time in Italy. In fact, van de Velde frequently invented ruins, which he would then transpose from their customary place in an Italianate landscape to a more unexpected one, the Dutch lowlands. Jan van de Velde II (Dutch, 1593–1641), “Landscape with Ruins”; etching, 1616. NYPL, Wallach Division, Print Collection

 
 

Jean-Honoré Fragonard (French, 1732–1806), “Satyr’s Dance," from the series Bacchanales, or Satyrs’ Games; etchings, 1763. NYPL, Wallach Division, Print Collection

 
 
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scrapbooking_sec6

Published Title: 

A Connection to Lord Byron

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The scrapbook owned and partially created by Julia Conyers is a de facto sketchbook, which contains pencil-and-ink-wash drawings, watercolors, and silhouettes from 1769 to 1830. Mounted to the leaves of the 9 1/2-by-12-inch bound book, the single sheets and smaller pieces of art range from copies of old masters to portraits to scenes from domestic life. Conyers became Lady Wrottesley when she married John Wrottesley in 1819. Wrottesley was a member of Parliament who was elevated to the House of Lords in 1838. They were then known as Baron and Baroness Wrottesley.

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Published Title: 

Displays of Artistic Training

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During the 19th century, many women of the upper classes received education that focused on such skills as drawing, painting, sewing, playing musical instruments, and learning foreign languages. Jessica Pigza observes that domestic arts such as embroidery, quilting, and decorative crafts were considered important skills. “So many of the pages of the album show evidence of the importance of artistic training and skill for young women of a certain class,” she says. “Shells, feathers, branches, birds, and plants abound on these pages.