Society

From Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence to a Ku Klux Klan robe, the Library’s collections guarantee that we cannot retreat from the realities — noble and ignoble — of the past.

I chose this image for various reasons. First of all, I liked the subject of the photo. This photo moves me because the subject is blind. I have a soft spot for people who are challenged. Second, I love books. I cannot stress how important and simply amazing books are. I like seeing this man reading, even though he can’t see. His disability doesn’t stop him from acquiring knowledge. Lastly, I like how the light is concentrated on the man. I find it visually pleasing. The light seems almost heavenly and serves to almost deify the man. He appears to be more than a man reading; the light transforms him into an inspiration for many people.

This photo, to me, is a symbol of strength and hope. This man cannot see, and yet he still reads. He is not giving up on tasks that normally require eyes; he is, in a sense, fighting his disability. He shows that there is hope for other blind people. He is living his life despite obstacles. This man lost his sight at the age of 17, and in the photo, he is clearly old. This picture proves that he was able to live out his days although blind. He is a survivor.

I took a photo of my little sister reading. I am trying to portray the importance of books, especially for the young. I encourage people of all ages to read no matter what obstacles may be preventing them from doing so.

Raisa


ID: 106142
Library for the Blind, Alfred Zaiss, Salesman of paper and twine, lost sight at 17, reading in room 116, June 1914
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building / New York Public Library Archives

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Society

From Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence to a Ku Klux Klan robe, the Library’s collections guarantee that we cannot retreat from the realities — noble and ignoble — of the past.

I thought this image was particularly appealing because of the contrast of the New York City buildings against the bright yellow school bus. This image reminds me of the sights that I see every day in New York. The blue and gray colors of the buildings of New York look overwhelming and impressive. The yellow school bus is a symbol of children, education, and knowledge. The bright yellow school bus reminds me of the New York Public Library, a safe place for children to learn and socialize with their friends. It is very important that this image remains in the archives of the New York Public Library because this image shows the majesty of New York City and the beauty of learning that school and the library enable.

In the picture I took I wanted to show an iconic place in New York City: Broadway. In this image you can see some of the great buildings located on this famous street, and all of the chaos that ensues when cars have to maneuver around the hundreds of pedestrians. Amongst this pandemonium, a school bus is turning the corner. This symbol of children, education, and knowledge is mixed with the city’s craziness.

Mary

Digital ID: 500239
Block 008: Broad Street between Pearl Street and Water Street (west side)
From Drugstore Photographs, Or, A Trip Along the Yangtze River, 1999, by Dylan Stone / Financial district (New York, N.Y.)
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building / Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs

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Society

From Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence to a Ku Klux Klan robe, the Library’s collections guarantee that we cannot retreat from the realities — noble and ignoble — of the past.

I chose this image by Berenice Abbott because I found the photo to be very elegant yet simultaneously modern. The landscape features many modern elements such as the billboard and the skyscrapers. This demonstrates the effect man has had on the world. Every natural element except the sky is completely swallowed up by the massive buildings and monuments. I really appreciate the geometric lines of the billboard. The darkness of the right side created by the shadows goes well with the lighter gray on the left because they contrast. In my opinion, this image represents the impact of industrialization on nature and society. It is important to preserve this image in the library's archives because it shows a clear representation of the extent to which humans have been able to take over the landscape in a short amount of time. If anything were to happen to civilization in the future, this photograph could offer visual details about the past.

The photo I took to resemble Abbott’s was photographed from the 161st street subway platform, near Yankee Stadium. When I saw the structure I was immediately captivated by the peculiar pattern that the steel and iron made. In the lower left corner it is possible to see Photograph I took to resemble the image

Maribel

Image ID: 482580
Columbus Circle, Manhattan. (February 10, 1938)
Photographer: Berenice Abbott
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building / Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs

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Society

From Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence to a Ku Klux Klan robe, the Library’s collections guarantee that we cannot retreat from the realities — noble and ignoble — of the past.

The photograph above portrays the tough and tedious work that was needed to build a prominent and illustrious building, the Empire State building. People risked their lives to construct this tall building and many people died as well. The photo I have taken shows people doing dangerous construction work as well.

Hamidul

Digital Gallery Image ID: 79849
Atop the Empire State-in construction (Chrysler Bldg & [Daily] News in middle foreground).
Photographer: Lewis Wickes Hine,1874-1940
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building / Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs

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Society

From Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence to a Ku Klux Klan robe, the Library’s collections guarantee that we cannot retreat from the realities — noble and ignoble — of the past.

I chose this image because it shows the wonder of childhood and the endless possibilities that are the source of that wonder. This child has just arrived at Ellis Island and she seems to be amazed at all the things to see in this new world. When I first saw this image I felt surprised-because the surprise on the child's face is so plain to see. I think it is very interesting how children show their emotions so plainly and so strongly on their faces. It is important to preserve this image in the library's archives because it is an important part of American history, and documents the wonderment in the eyes of one of the many Ellis Island arrivals.

original photo: Gabriel

Again, we see the raw display of open emotion on a small child’s face in this picture. The
palette of expressions little kids are capable of making seems to be endless, this is just one of many.

Ariana

Digital Gallery Image ID: 212147
Italian child finds her first penny, Ellis Island (1926)
Photographer: Lewis Wickes HIne,1874-1940
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building / Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs

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Observation

Observations of the natural world raise the questions: What do we see? What do we actually know?

BEAUTY OLD YET EVER NEW ETERNAL VOICE AND INWARD WORD

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Creativity

Human imagination is given no more powerful expression than through the arts, celebrating who we were, are, and will become … and the connections are forged across virtually all cultural and societal divides.

Aquila capite Albo, The White headed Eagle; The Size of the Eagle head

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Society

From Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence to a Ku Klux Klan robe, the Library’s collections guarantee that we cannot retreat from the realities — noble and ignoble — of the past.

Here's my favorite book: "Handling Sin" by Michael Malone. It's a spin on "Don Quixote", set in today's Deep South. A riotous romp of a tale.

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Society

From Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence to a Ku Klux Klan robe, the Library’s collections guarantee that we cannot retreat from the realities — noble and ignoble — of the past.

I love your 100th celebration and wish to participate. This lady reminds us ot our US history during the depression. A great artefact.

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Observation

Observations of the natural world raise the questions: What do we see? What do we actually know?

Jane D. Austin, 1831-1894.

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Denise S. Szabo

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Miranda Shutte

A Room With A View, E.M. Forster